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Sunday, March 15, 2015

A revelation about what to do next creatively

By Ted Slowik

Patti Smith and Robert Mapplethorpe
I've been thinking a lot lately about what to do next, creatively, in my free time.

Free time is a precious thing, and it shouldn't be squandered. Take it from someone who's been dead for six minutes. There are better ways to spend your time than binge-watching Netflix on the couch. Trust me.

It's taken six months to figure out what I want to do next. For the past several years I've focused on music. And I feel I've become a much better songwriter, musician, performer, vocalist and recording artist. I still enjoy music very much and plan to continue making it whenever I want. And it'll make me happy and be fun.

But I've felt for some time that music is not my true calling, and that writing is. The question I've been trying to answer is, what to write? Nonfiction or fiction? A novel or short stories? What do I have to say that's worth saying?

The answer came to me while I was camping in Florida this past week. My sister Liz, with whom I've always been especially close, loaned me the Patti Smith book "Just Kids." I've been reading a lot of rock bios and memoirs lately, about Eric Clapton, George Harrison, Keith Richards, Patti Boyd, Roy Buchanan and others. "Just Kids" may be the best-written I've read. It won the 2010 National Book Award for Nonfiction.

I didn't know much about Patti Smith. "Just Kids" tells the story of Smith and Robert Mapplethorpe starting out as starving artists in New York in the late 1960s and early 1970s. It's a beautiful love story, and the book is a fine showcase for Smith's skills as a writer thanks to her lifelong love for poetry.

Arthur Rimbaud
Smith was greatly influenced by the French poet Jean Nicolas Arthur Rimbaud (1854-1891), one of the greatest poets ever to have lived, ever though he only created for a brief period in his late teens. He famously wrote to a friend the following lines that described his decadent behavior:

"I'm now making myself as scummy as I can. Why? I want to be a poet, and I'm working at turning myself into a seer. You won't understand any of this, and I'm almost incapable of explaining it to you. The idea is to reach the unknown by the derangement of all the senses. It involves enormous suffering, but one must be strong and be a born poet. It's really not my fault."

I could relate to the notion that complete commitment to one's craft is necessary to create art that is truly worthwhile and lasting. And maybe the young can do it. That is, live irresponsibly and in poverty for a few years. But not old people with bills and mortgages and responsibilities and day jobs.

Because face it, if you were any good as an artist or musician at age 50, you'd be doing it full-time.

I'll be honest. Since the heart attack a year ago I've wondered at times why I'm still here. What's my purpose?

So after reading Smith's book I realized I should write the story of how my wife Jo and I met and fell in love.
First date, Valentine's Day 1985

This works for a number of reasons. First of all, I cannot think of subject matter more personal and meaningful. Family is most important, after all, and I'll write the story so our kids Hannah and Noah will always know how much I loved their mother.

The timing seems right. Has it really been 30 years? Gosh, seems like yesterday. I remember well the love I felt for Jo and there are still many of our friends around I could talk to in order to gain additional details and perspectives.

It solves the dilemma of what to do as a creative outlet other than music that is purposeful and rewarding and without regard to any sense of commercial success. Ours is a beautiful story, and I intend to write it for an audience of three people, as best as I can. I expect the process of telling this story will require a great deal of time and effort.

That's OK. I can continue doing other musical and writing projects while working on this story. Maybe my purpose for being here is to tell this story. There is universal truth in love and beauty.
Honeymoon in California, 1990








Monday, March 9, 2015

Crossing the 10k YouTube milestone with "Refugee Blues"

By Ted Slowik









Just a short post today as I'm camping in Florida and reception is spotty. But, hey, "Refuee Blues" topped 10,000 views on YouTube. It's cool, they send you an email. Thanks Celeste Mackey for inviting me to do a dramatic reading of this for her Literature of the Holocaust class three years ago. Here's the link. 



Sunday, March 1, 2015

Fun times during Allison Flood show at Chicago Street Pub

By Ted Slowik
Allison Flood and friends

Last night was a blast hanging out at Chicago Street Pub in Joliet for the celebration of Allison Flood's solo debut "Blackbird" on the Flipside Works label.
Eric Johnson, Allison Flood, John Condron

I reviewed the CD just a few weeks ago on this blog, and the review also was featured on No Depression. I don't have anything new to say about Allison's music since then but I do want to share a few pictures of the fun evening with friends.
Allison Flood, Denise Hegarty, Jill Condron

Chicago Street Pub is a wonderful place, and I've described many times how it's the hub of great live, local, original music in Will County. It's important to remember it's people who make places special. The interactions you have with them, the good times you share and the memories you create are what matter.

Triz
So, thanks Mike and Kathy Trizna for keeping the Pub going these many years and for supporting original music.


Sunday, February 22, 2015

Why "Wrigley Field" deserves to be the next Cubs theme song

By Ted Slowik

Last month Chicago Tribune writer Mark Caro started a movement to retire the 1984 Steve Goodman tune "Go, Cubs, Go" as the quasi-official Cubs theme song, played over the PA in Wrigley Field after Cubs victories since 2007.

Mark's been on WGN radio talking about his campaign and last week the movement got a boost from Dan Bernstein, co-host of 670 The Score’s “Boers and Bernstein Show.”A contest is underway to see if there's a song out there that might be a worthy successor to "Go, Cubs, Go."

This week I entered an original, "Wrigley Field," which friend Kev Wright helped record. Here's why it deserves consideration.

First, I'm a lifelong Cubs fan, just as passionate about the team as Goodman was. My lyrics are sung from the heart, with more than 40 years of rooting for the team. As a Chicagoan I've cheered on the Bears, Blackhawks, Bulls and White Sox. But my love for the Cubs dates back to the mid-1970s.

I'll tell you exactly why there's nothing else quite like being a Cubs fan. It has something to do with the fact that Wrigley Field was the only park in all of Major League Baseball that didn't have lights, until 1988. That, and the championship drought that dates back to their last World Series win in 1908. Being a Cubs fan is special. When they do eventually win another championship it's going to be the biggest party ever, and I want to experience the full effect of that.

My brothers Frank and Mike are big Cubs fans. Every year for as long as I can remember a group of us have gone down to see the Cubs play in Wrigley Field. We tailgate near Belmont Harbor off Recreation Drive, walk to the park and always have a great time. I don't really have opinions about the gentrification of the Wrigleyville and Lakeview neighborhoods, the quality of the talent on the field or ownership decisions about Wrigley Field renovations. For me, the Cubs are about spending quality time together with family, and there's nothing more meaningful in life.

Not only do I have a Steve Goodman-like love for the team, the song "Wrigley Field" is a sincere ode to the joys of Cubdom. It's short and sweet. The melody is catchy, the tempo is upbeat and the words are simple. You can watch the video entry here or listen to an audio version of it here.

Finally, just a little bit of fun history about this song. Three years ago WGN radio sponsored a similar contest. When I learned of the contest in February 2012 I wrote "Wrigley Field" on a Saturday night, recorded a sloppy audio demo and submitted my entry via email.

Then an incredible thing happened. On Monday morning, Jonathan Brandmeier played my song on his WGN radio show. This was less than 48 hours after the song came into existence. I knew then it was good. Sure, the recording was amateurish and it didn't make the voting round. But the tune is worthy. It's a good song, and deserves consideration to become the next Cubs theme song.



Saturday, February 14, 2015

What's next for ex-Righteous Hillbillies cofounder Kev Wright?

Michelle Gadeikis photo
By Ted Slowik

Guitarist Kev Wright announced this week that he has parted ways with The Righteous Hillbillies, the band he cofounded eight years ago with Brent James.

In a Feb. 11 Facebook post, Kev said "with a heavy heart" that the split was mutual and "for personal and creative reasons." A post on the Hillbillies' Facebook page signed by Brent, bassist Jeff Bella and drummer Barret Harvey said "with regret" that Kev was no longer with the band, which will resume live shows in May and will announce Kev's replacement "when the time is right."

The timing of the split is difficult, as the band has just wrapped work on its third album, recorded at legendary Fame studios in Muscle Shoals, Ala., produced by Craig Bishop and funded by money raised through Kickstarter. Kev wrote seven songs on the new album, Brent wrote three and they co-wrote two. Kev has always been the band's lead guitarist while Brent remains lead singer and now sole remaining original member.

It's hard to imagine the Hillbillies without Kev. The band's bio for the 2010 Grundy County Corn Festival tells its 2007 inception as well as any version, recounting how John Condron bestowed the band's name when Kev and Brent were playing as an acoustic duo following the split of Brent's band The Stone City Stragglers. (The two had previously played together in The Brent James Band, so their friendship goes way back.)

Kev's hands (Andy Goodwin photo)
What can fans expect from Kev, who turns 60 next month, now that he's left the Hillbillies? Probably more live acoustic performances, a solo album that he begins recording in March and plenty of fine guitar work on songs he writes and sings. There's no doubt Kev's desire to sing and play more of his own material contributed to his decision to leave the band.

Kev's songwriting and vocals have always been exceptional, though largely overlooked for the past decade because of his lead guitar abilities. Consider his song "Journey Road," which appears on The Brent James Band album "The Road Less Traveled." "You can spend your whole life worrying, thinking about your 'could have beens,'" Kev writes, though he says his late grandfather wrote all the words to the song through wisdom he directly imparted to Kev.

The band's version is slickly produced with lush harmonies and instrumentation, but on the day of his announcement Kev posted an acoustic demo of "Journey Road" that is beautiful in its simplicity and hauntingly prescient in its meaning. Kev seems like a man with purpose, and that is to share his gifts for creating music in ways that can't always be realized by a four-piece southern rock band with two electric guitars, bass and drums.

More recent clues hint at the direction Kev is headed. The Hillbillies played an all-acoustic show Jan. 25 at Chicago Street Pub In Joliet, IL, its first and now it would seem only such show, at least with Kev in the lineup. Before a packed house on a Sunday afternoon the band re-imagined its roadhouse setlist by squeezing every bit of tenderness out of tunes that have always resonated well with crowds at loud volumes and high energy levels.

The Mug Shot Saints
Also, Kev has performed acoustically recently with "Bourbon Cowboy" Jeff Givens and the Mug Shot Saints, including Dec. 19 at Metro in Chicago and Feb. 4 at Schubas. The band includes Jason Botka and Johnny Gadeikis, another ex-Stone City Straggler who played bass with the Hillbillies until 2014."It's good to play with Johnny again," Kev said.

Kev has publicly shared many demo recordings that showcase his songwriting and singing. His writing shows the influence of Woody Guthrie, Robert Johnson and others. His compositions range from straight-ahead rock of "Black Jack Mama" to the tender ballad "I Could..." Kev also displays a social conscience. "This Is America" is an angry ode about income inequality. Kev can do it all, but sounds best when he's tapping his deepest inspirations, like the swampy "Gasoline."

Take a listen to this beautifully melodic Leo Kottke-like instrumental "Winter." Then this live recording of "County Jail." It's not hard to imagine the future Kev performing solo with a bass drum and multiple instruments much like the post-Backyard Tire Fire Edward David Anderson.

In more than one way, this week's announcement signals that Kev has come full circle these past eight years since he and Brent decided to put away the acoustic guitars and go electric with the Hillbillies. The band would be well-served to carry on with a lead guitar gunslinger, one content to contribute the occasional vocal and songwriting duty.

But Kev is so much more than just an amazing lead guitarist. He's a deep soul with something to say who can write lyrics and tell stories in honest and heartfelt ways. Kev plays his songs with superb musicianship and vocals laden with emotion. His voice needs to be heard.









Saturday, February 7, 2015

Allison Flood shines on solo debut "Blackbird"

By Ted Slowik

Good things are worth waiting for, especially debut solo albums nearly a decade in the making.

Nine years after her band Stone City Stragglers delivered its third and final album, Allison Flood has released her solo debut on the Flipside Works label. "Blackbird" is a five-song collection of beautifully crafted originals delivered with ethereal harmonies, expert instrumentation and exquisite production by John Condron with assistance from Bill Aldridge of Third City Sound in Joliet, Illinois.

She was known as Allison Moroni back when she was in the Stragglers with five bandmates including Brent James, who continued his career with The Righteous Hillbillies. Since then she's had two kids with musician/firefighter Chris Flood, who says, "I loved her music so much I married her. (Her) first solo record is delayed because I keep getting her pregnant."

The songs on "Blackbird" are about relationships, though they also work as precious stories told by a young mother re-entering the music business after an absence. In the opener "Harbor" she sings, "I've been lost and I've been found, I've been somewhere in between, now I call this house a home, still feel like I'm lost at sea." And when she sings in the chorus, "Won't you find your way back to me?" she could easily be addressing the Stragglers' extensive following, asking old fans to rediscover her music.

The Stragglers were a big regional draw a decade ago. A Chicago Reader preview of the band's appearance at the 2005 Chicago Country Music Festival noted, "This Joliet sextet stands tall among this year's Taste Stage acts thanks to the sweet harmonies of Brent James and Allison Moroni, whose voices casually intertwine a la Gram and Emmylou."

Harmonies are the highlight of "Blackbird," though there's nothing lacking about the musicianship, either. The backing vocals and accompaniment on "Ties That Bind" create a Fleetwood Mac-like vibe; sounds created by guitars, harmonium and other instruments are appropriately woven among Flood's sparse acoustic guitar. There's not a note or sound that seems out of place in the 20-minute collection.

Yet it's the vocals on "Blackbird" that stand out, which speaks to the strength of the songwriting and lyrics in particular. When, on "Things Dead & Gone," she sings, "It isn't easier to lie when no one's listening to you," is she saying that during her hiatus she remained true to her musical calling? And in "Come To Me," when she sings about distance between people she's surely telling a story about estranged lovers, though read another way she could just as easily be talking about the fans who loved her in the Stragglers.

In the closer "Easy" she sings, "I never knew it would be so easy to forget me." 

Fans of Allison Flood's music are about to discover how wonderful it is to hear new music from her again.

The release of "Blackbird" will be celebrated with a performance featuring appearances by Brian Motyll, Matt Biskie and others on Saturday, Feb. 28 at Chicago Street Pub, 75 N. Chicago St., Joliet, IL. 



 

Sunday, January 18, 2015

The story behind the new song "Mama"

By Ted Slowik

Yesterday was a very special day. At a family gathering celebrating our Mom's 89th birthday, I played her the new song I wrote called "Mama," which she inspired.

The performance took place in front of about 25 family members at Salerno's in Hodgkins. You can watch a video of the performance here.

Our mom, Dr. Clare Slowik, is an amazing person. Not only did she raise 12 kids, she went back to school, earned a doctorate and was a professor of nursing at Lewis University. She's so special the Sunday Chicago Tribune published a front-page feature about her on Mother's Day, 1989.

The notion of performing the song for her on her birthday didn't occur to me until a few days ago, and after running the idea by my wife Jo and sister Liz and receiving their support I decided it would be a nice gift for Mom.

I'm fascinated by how artists create tangible works out of thin air. A song, written story, painting or other piece starts with an idea in the mind of the creator. It is first imagined, then realized.

The idea for "Mama" came about in mid-December. I was preparing to write new material and thinking, "What subjects matter most to me?" Since I'm planning to write a collection of new songs I'd recently been thinking about my favorite albums, and it occurred to me that John Lennon's solo debut "Plastic Ono Band" opens with the track "Mother." Eureka! I had my first topic.

I'd written about family before, and composed the historical story "Slowiks" for my parents' 50th wedding anniversary in 1995. I'll always remember playing it for them, sitting at their kitchen table. For Mom's song, I didn't want to write a literal story of her life. Instead, I wanted to tap into a "universal truth" about a child's love for his mother and create a work that others could relate to.

It started with the first line. I'd be driving to and from work thinking of truths to say about Mom and I came up with: "Mama is the greatest person that I ever met." The melody flowed instantly from that first line. Over the next week or so I'd think of more lines and scribble them on scraps of paper until on Dec. 30 I had the whole thing mapped out in my head.

That night after my neighbor Scott Kinsella's annual Risk game I came home, picked up the Martin acoustic guitar, strummed a G chord and played it through for the first time. Here's a video of that play-through. Notice how I sing the melody in a low register for the first few lines before settling on a more comfortable range. You're watching creativity as it happens, folks! What had been imagined in my mind became, at that moment, something able to be appreciated by others. It was rough, but fully realized.

Next I wanted to record an audio demo. I imagined electric guitars, drums, backing vocals and all kinds of notes and sounds, only some of which I was able to capture on the first audio demo, which you can listen to here. It was recorded Jan. 2. I love the sound of the Gibson ES335, which musician/architect friend Laurance Glasser recently got sounding great again!

Next, I played the song for my guitar teacher Kev Wright during a lesson, which you can watch here. Kev offered excellent suggestions, including adding a stop before the solo. (I liked the tip so much I also added one to the first verse). When we played the song through together, I started the solo on the low G note, third fret on the top E string. As a 30-year bassist I'm comfortable around low notes, and that's where Kev showed me patterns like the "blues box" when we began our lessons together a year ago. I eventually work my way up to find where to play scales in the middle and top of the neck, but I often start low.

Well, Kev heard that and shared another great idea. He thought his Eastwood Sidejack Baritone guitar would sound great on the song, so he loaned it to me. I agreed it would add a really cool sound, so yesterday I recorded another audio demo of the song with the Eastwood, which you can listen to here.

Structurally, I think of this song as having "sections" as opposed to choruses and verses. Brian Wilson and Paul McCartney wrote many songs that way. The melody is determined by the phrasing of the lyrics, so the chord changes are not always the same way because each line of lyric is different.

So for all you songwriting aficionados that's the anatomy of how the new song came to be. Thanks for reading and if you're able to be sure to let your Mama know you love her!



"Mama"  Words and music by Ted Slowik

Mama is the greatest person that I ever met
She loved me unconditionally that I won’t forget
Mama always knew when I was lying
She always figured out when I wasn’t trying
How she knew I’ll never know

Mama is a saint you know I pray to her every day
She showed me how to do that so I wouldn’t lose my way
She taught me how to tell between what’s wrong and what is right
And how to solve your problems without getting into fights

Mama always knew what I was I doing
She always sensed when there was trouble brewing
And how to work it out

(solo)

Mama always said the best is yet to come
And the secret to life is to keep on having fun

Mama listens to me when nobody else will
She always sees right through me and yet she loves me still
Mama has to leave you know I hate to see her go
I love her with all my heart that I’m sure she knows